Shyam Kamadolli

Chief Business Officer, Tactai, Inc.

Silicon Valley is aiming to monetize VR with the likes of MasterCard, Swarovski, IKEA and Lowe’s Company playing a part. Tactai products like Tactai Touch preserve and provide a refined sense of touch in VR.

Tactai’s technology goes further than past touch feedback — or haptic — devices since it gives you a much more fine-grained sense of what you’re touching, based on a demo I saw.

Imagine you're a retailer. Now imagine you had the magical power to make the shopping experience addictive, seamless, convenient and enjoyable. E-commerce started that transformation, but in a few short years the immersive world of virtual reality could finish it, turning even modern-day retail on its head.

Today Virtual Reality / Augmented Reality (VR/AR) feels a lot like mobile computing did twenty years ago. Devices are too expensive and underperform user expectations; there are big gaps in user experience, and neither business models nor market leaders have been established yet.  And like mobile before it, VR will be the next major computing paradigm.

Have you ever gotten so wrapped up in an immersive virtual experience that you reach out to touch something, and when you can’t this realisation immediately kills the illusion and takes you away from enjoying the experience? Tactai Touch offers a solution.

Startup Tactai inked a deal with Ericsson as its first client and will offer CES 2017 attendees a hands-on demonstration of its “Dynamic Tactile Wave” technology at the Ericsson booth.

The Queen of Haptics is Katherine J. Kuchenbecker, the brilliant Stanford-trained engineer who oversees the haptics group at the GRASP lab and supervised Culbertson’s work. The daughter of a developmental psychologist—and, one is not surprised to learn, a member of the Stanford volleyball team that twice won N.C.A.A. titles—she recognizes the gratifyingly large number of women engineers in haptics.